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Course Descriptions

HISTORY (HI) 

HI 151 World Civilizations I (3)

A multicultural approach to studying the world’s early civilization, it examines their political, social, economic and cultural evolutions. It focuses on the lives, work and service of Confucius, the Buddha, Jesus Christ, Mohammed and other individuals who made meaningful impacts on the moral ethical development of humankind. Along with historical knowledge, the course emphasizes the development of reading, writing, speaking, cognitive and collaborative skills crucial to success in college and beyond.

HI 152 World Civilizations II (3)

A multicultural approach to studying the world’s modern civilizations, it examines their political, social, economic and cultural evolutions. It focuses on modern moral and ethical dilemmas such as the colonization of peoples, world wars, genocide programs, women’s rights and the ecological consequences of industrialization. Along with historical knowledge, the course emphasizes the development of reading, writing, speaking, cognitive and collaborative skills crucial to success in college and beyond.

HI 201 America through Civil War (3)

Starting with the convergence of European, African and Native American cultures in the sixteenth century, this course studies the multicultural history of the United States through its civil war. It focuses on the lives, work and service of Thomas Jefferson, Tecumseh, Harriet Tubman and other individuals who made meaningful impacts on the moral and ethical development of the nation. Along with historical knowledge, the course emphasizes the development of reading, writing, speaking, cognitive and collaborative skills crucial to success in college and beyond.

HI 202 America since Civil War (3)

A study of the political, social, economic and cultural history of the United States since its Civil War. It focuses on the moral and ethical dilemmas associated with immigration, industrialization, economic depressions, world wars, the Cold War, the rights of women, African Americans, Native Americans, and other groups. Along with historical knowledge the course emphasizes the development of reading, writing, speaking, cognitive and collaborative skills crucial to success in college and beyond.

HI 301 Early America (3)

American history from 1492 to 1815, analyzing the formation and growth of European colonies in America, their break with the British Empire and the formation of the United States of America.
Prerequisites: EN 102, COM 101

HI 302 American Civil War Era (3)

American History from 1815 to 1877, examining the Age of Jackson, the growth of sectionalism, the Civil War, and the Reconstruction.
Prerequisites: EN 102, COM 101

HI 304 American Between the Wars (3)

American history from 1917 to 1945, it examines the Prohibition, organized crime, the Ku Klux Klan, the “monkey trial” over the teaching of evolution, the migration of African Americans from the rural South to the urban North, the Great Depression, the New Deal and the isolationist foreign policy of the 1920s and 1930s. This course integrates history and literature through the writings of Sinclair Lewis, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, John Steinbeck and Zora Neale Hurston.
Prerequisites: EN 102, COM 101

HI 305 Contemporary America (3)

Analyses of the forced that shaped contemporary American, focusing on the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement and the counter-cultural movements of the 1960s.
Prerequisites: EN 102, COM 101

HI 321 Ancient Europe (3)

Analyzes Ancient Greek, Hellenistic, and Roman history, politics, and culture. Focuses on political leaders such as Pericles, Julius Caesar and Augustus; philosophers such as Pythagoras, Socrates, Plate and Aristotle; poets/dramatist such as Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides. This course also examines how these civilizations viewed and treated women.
Prerequisites: EN 102, COM 101

HI 322 Medieval Life and Thought (3)

This course integrates the perspectives of history and religion into the study of medieval Europe (ca. 500 to 1500 A.D.). Religious history combines insight into the nature of religious experiences and structures with a proper understanding of their political, economic, and social setting. This course satisfies the 300-level Religious Studies General Education Core requirement or the Interdisciplinary requirement. Prerequisites: EN 102, COM 101, and any 100-200 level History course and any 100-200 level Religion course.

HI 323 Pre-Modern Europe (3)

Emergence of Europe as the most dynamic region on earth between 1500 and 1815, including subjects such as the Renaissance, reformation, beginnings of modern science and modern nations, and the first global economy.
Prerequisites: EN 102, COM 101

HI 324 Modern Europe (3)

Europe from 1815 to the present gained global hegemony and then lost it after World War II. Analyzes developments leading to the world wars and the Cold War, the rise of the European Common Market, and the collapse of communist regimes in Eastern Europe.
Prerequisites: EN 102, COM 101

This course examines why the United States went to war in the jungles of Southeast Asia that few Americans knew anything about. Students will examine the nature of the war itself, the tactics and strategies applied by both sides to the conflict, and experiences of soldiers on both sides. Central to the war effort, the home fronts held the keys to success or failure for both sides. Along with historical and political knowledge, the course emphasized the development of reading, writing, speaking, cognitive and collaborative skills. 
Prerequisites: EN 102, COM 101

HI 344 Modern India and Southeast Asia (3)

This course surveys the history of Southeast Asia from the nineteenth century to the present. It considers the nature of the traditional communities of Southeast Asia, the imposition and impact of western colonial rules, the emergence and activities of anti-colonial movements, the formation of sovereign states, the effects of the Cold War, and contemporary politics.
Prerequisites: EN 102, COM 101

HI 401 U.S. Constitution I (3)

Examines the nature of law and constitutionalism in the United States, with an emphasis on the struggles for power and calls for accountability from various sectors.
Prerequisites: EN 102, COM 101

HI 402 U.S. Constitution II (3)

Examines the evolution of civil liberties in the United States, including free speech, religious liberties, rights of the accused and the right to privacy. Cross-Listed with POL 402. Offered alternate years.

HI 403 American Diplomacy (3)

This course is a historical study of America's role in the world. The course emphasizes analyses of complex questions involving U.S. relations with other nations and peoples, requiring the student to investigate primary sources and conflicting historical points of view. We will survey America's international relations from the founding of the Republic to the present, addressing a broad spectrum of foreign policy initiatives - ranging from benign and peaceful (i.e., negotiations) to coercive and violent (i.e., armed conflict) - in a variety of geographical settings.
Prerequisites: EN 102, COM 101

HI 405 African Americans and Racial Justice (3)

This course examines African American history from slavery to black lives matter. It will examine their experience as slaves before the Civil War, their treatment as second- class citizens during the "Jim Crow" era, and their struggles through the Civil Rights era. The course will follow their story through individuals such as Anthony Johnson, Phillis Wheatley, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. Du Bois, Marcus Garvey, Ida B. Wells, Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, and Fanny Lou Hamer. This capstone course will advance the Marianist value of "promoting the dignity of all human persons." It also advances the Native Hawaiian value of "caring and compassion for other people." Racism is a global problem. Nations such South Africa and the United States experienced blatant forms of racism with their twentieth century apartheid and "Jim Crow" segregation laws. History 405: African Americans and Racial Justice employs project-based learning. It will examine the African American experience by having students write reflective essays on phases of their history in America. Prerequisites: EN 102 and COM 101.

HI 406 Women in America (3)

This course is designed to explore women’s experiences both as an integral part of American history/politics and as a distinct and exciting perspective on studying those fields. Using a variety of sources including books, letters, diaries, fiction, and film, this course will examine the public and privates lives of American women of divergent class, racial, ethnic, and religious backgrounds from the colonial era to the present.
Prerequisites: EN 102, COM 101

HI 407 History of Rock-n-Roll (3)

Examines the dynamic force that helped to shape contemporary American society and culture; looking at its roots in black gospel and blues, folk, country-western, and pop; and following its evolution from rhythm and blues, folk rock, acid rock, heavy metal, disco, punk, and rap.
Prerequisites: EN 102, COM 101

HI 418 International History of the Cold War (3)

This course considers problems and issues that affected different regions of the world as those problems and issues related to the Soviet-American rivalry, or the Cold War, between 1945 and 1991. Specifically, it explores the origin of the Cold War; its implications for the United States and the Soviet Union; its impact in Europe, Latin America, the Middle East, Sub-Saharan Africa, South and Central Asia, East Asia, and Southeast Asia; and the collapse of Soviet style communism in Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union itself.
Prerequisites: EN 102, COM 101

HI 419 Contemporary World Order (3)

This course considers the rapid changes and new challenges facing humanity in the contemporary era. Using the “Rise and Fall of Great Powers” as its conceptual background, this course explores the emergence of a new world order, with special emphasis on the rise of China and other emerging market economies, accelerated globalization (i.e., the economic, cultural, and political integration of global communities), growing economic and social inequalities, as well as new social movements and key security issues.
Prerequisites: EN 102, COM 101

HI 422 Pre-Modern Russia (3)

Explores the beginning, flourishing, and decline of the Russian Empire from the first Slaves until the October Socialist Revolution of 1917. The course will provide insights into Russian lifelong hidden behind the “iron curtain” including the history of Russian spirituality, literature, ballet, theater, folk art and other aspects of Russian culture. Classes are augmented by slides and demonstrations of Russian folk arts.
Prerequisites: EN 102, COM 101

HI 424 Modern Russia (3)

Explores the history of Russia from the Socialist Revolution of 1917 to the present. The course of historical events and the main trends of life in contemporary Russia will be recounted and analyzed. Great works of Russian philosophers and writers, composers and artists will be interwoven with the historical observations, as well as the customs of Russian daily life, beliefs, traditions, and habits. Classes are augmented by slides, videos and materials from the Russian media and taped interviews with Russian veterans and politicians, housewives, and university students.
Prerequisites: EN 102, COM 101

HI 438 Globalization and Capitalism (3)

This course introduces students to the study of political economy. It surveys the thought of political economists ranging from Adam Smith, Karl Marx and Joseph Schumpeter to contemporary thinkers. It also analyzes the contemporary global capitalist system as it affects inequalities, varieties of capitalism, U.S. competitiveness, the dynamics of the international financial system and the sustainability of the globe’s environment.
Prerequisites: EN 102, COM 101

HI 439 Global Financial Crises (3)

The international financial crisis that originated in the U.S. subprime mortgage market has deeply affected the global political economy. It indicates a shift in economic power away from the advanced economies of Europe, the United States and Japan to rapidly emerging economies such as China, India and Brazil. Indeed, the crisis is likely to trigger fundamental changes in the institutional architecture of international finance and the geo-economic landscape of globalization. This course aims to provide a macro-perspective on the evolution of the global financial system since 1850, an analysis of the origins of the 2008 Financial Crisis and the likely consequences of this crisis for the global political economy to students.
Prerequisites: EN 102, COM 101

HI 441 Dynasties of China (3)

Why did China invade Tibet in 1949, the most peaceful nation in the world?  Was Confucius popular in his lifetime?  What do the Chinese people consider as their best dynasty and why?  Did you know that China had a female emperor?  Her name was Wu Zetain.  These and many more fascinating questions will be answered in this course about the dynastic history of Pre-Modern China.
Prerequisites: EN 102, COM 101

HI 442 Modern China (3)

Examines China’s internal and external struggles in the modern world. Including the rise and fall of the China dynasty, the Nationalist period, the civil war and communist rule.
Prerequisites: EN 102, COM 101

HI 443 Samurai Japan (3)

The Shinto religion’s reverence for nature, the Heian aristocrat’s penchant for the subtle and the sublime, the samurai warrior’s insistence on loyalty and honor, and Zen Buddhism’s reminder that nothing lasts come together to form the culture that produced Tanka/Haiku poems, the tea ceremony, Noh drama, the Bushido (warrior) Code and the world’s first great novel The Tale of Genji.
Prerequisites: EN 102, COM 101

HI 444 Modern Japan (3)

This course offers a study of the rise, fall, and rebirth of Japan during the modem era. The course focuses on the internal politics, economics, and culture of the country. It also examines Japan's unique culture and how it shaped and was shaped by the Globalism of the modem world.
Prerequisites: EN 102, COM 101

HI 446 Modern Middle East (3)

This course surveys the key processes, events and personalities that have shaped the societies, states and economies of the Middle East since the 18th century, with a brief study of the region prior to that time.
Prerequisites: EN 102, COM 101

HI 450 Pre-Modern Hawaii (3)

This course is designed to broaden the understanding and appreciation of Hawaii’s oral tradition and its impact on the development of Hawaii’s history during the pre-Western contact era. Emphasis is placed on the lineal descent of significant heredity chiefs of Hawaii, Maui, O’ahu, and Kaua’i. The student will gain deeper appreciation of the importance of Oral tradition and Oratory.
Prerequisites: EN 102, COM 101

HI 451 Modern Hawaii (3)

This course will examine Hawaii and its peoples' pasts, focusing on the rise of the Monarchy and the challenges that led to its overthrow through the issues that confront Native Hawaiians and the people living In Hawaii today. Through these significant moments In Hawaii History we will discuss how the people, Native Hawaiian and not, adapted to these changes and each other. During the first half of this course, through the use of oral histories, cultural mythology, as well as traditional documentation we will examine the core cultural beliefs that shaped, guided and defined the Native Hawaiian people and the Kingdom of Hawaii as they confronted massive changes introduced to Hawaii through the rise of global Imperialism. The second half of this course will focus on the overthrow of the Monarchy, Hawall's subsequent annexation to the United States of America and the Issues confronted by the people of Hawaii as a territory and state within the US. Along with historical knowledge the course emphasizes the development of reading, writing, speaking, cognitive and collaborative skills crucial to success In college and the employment community. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: any 100 or 200 level history courses, EN 102, and COM 101.

HI 452 Pre-Modern Pacific Islands (3)

This course examines the settlement of Polynesia, Micronesia, and Melanesia from settlement to their colonial experiences from first contact through the 18th century. This course focuses on the indigenous development of this diverse region as well as the cross-cultural experiences of colonialism. Fulfills Global Awareness and Adaptation and Change General Education requirements. Offered alternate years, Prerequisite: any 100 or 200 level history course, EN 102, and COM 101.

HI 453 Modern Pacific Islands (3)

This course examines the impact and legacy of imperialism and colonialism on the indigenous inhabitants of the Pacific. Examining the Pacific from the 18th century to the present, this course focuses on the emergence of the Pacific as a distinct and influential region in today’s global community and how indigenous islanders have adapted and fared during this post-colonial period.
Prerequisites: EN 102, COM 101

HI 475 History and Politics of Film (3)

This course examines the settlement of Polynesia, Micronesia, and Melanesia and their colonial experiences from first contact through today. This course focuses on the indigenous development of this diverse region as well as the cross-cultural experiences of colonialism and the challenges of navigating in the global community in a post-colonial world. Fulfills Education for Adaptation and Change and Global Awareness General Education requirements. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: EN 102, COM 101, and any 100 or 200 level history course.

HI 480 Special Topics (3)

Selected topics in history to be announced.

HI 490 Directed Study (3)

Individualized study of a topic arranged through the program advisor.
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

HI 494 Research Seminar (3)

This is a capstone course that explores the core principles and methodologies of historical and political studies. It also monitors the students’ career preparation. In this course, the student will conduct research in history and political science (learning outcome 4). Utilizing this research, the student will write a research paper and present it in class (learning outcome 4). The research paper written by the student will incorporate the following principles and methodologies: understanding change, continuity and causality (learning outcome 1), comprehension of the workings of politics and governance (learning outcome 2), awareness of perspectives and interpretations (learning outcome 3). During the course, the instructor will review the progress of each student in preparing for his or her career.
Prerequisites: Students must be in their junior or senior year; will complete a minimum of 18 credits of the major in the semester they enroll in HI/POL 494; and have the permission of the discipline coordinator to enroll in this course.