Course Descriptions

RELIGION (RE)

RE 103 World Religions (3)

Within the context of the dialogue between Christianity and the other world religions, the student will explore the diverse historical, philosophical, and spiritual foundations from which the major religious traditions in the world have arisen. The course examines the lives of their founders, their basic teachings, and the historical development of their communities and institutions, while providing an inter-religious survey of ethics. Offered every semester. This course fulfills the lower division Religious Studies General Education Core requirement.

RE 205 The Christian God and Human Experience (3)

Students probe the nature of human experience and religious meaning, with special attention given to experience of the Judeo-Christian God. Contemporary Catholic-Christian faith is systematically analyzed in terms of its core concepts, values and visions. This study addresses the question and critique of God in the modern world and surveys contemporary theology in a spirit that is Catholic, Christian and Ecumenical. Offered every semester. This course fulfills the lower division Religious Studies General Education Core requirement.

RE 211 The Bible as Controversy (3)

Ancient scriptural documents have erupted into modern controversies, ranging from questions over biblical fundamentalism to the meaning of Jesus in contemporary times. Questions concerning the creation stories, the monarchy of Israel, the movement of Jesus the Jew, the writings of Paul, and the historical and contemporary uses and abuses of the Bible will be examined in detail. Offered annually. This course fulfills the lower division Religious Studies General Education Core requirement.

English 102 and Communication 101 are prerequisites for all upper division courses.

RE 301 Jesus, God and Man (3)

Students will explore the Jesus of History and the Christ of Faith with consideration given to the varied perspectives of the Church’s living-faith tradition. Students will study contemporary controversies that pertain to the meaning, person and story of Jesus of Nazareth. Special attention will be given to understanding the applicability of Jesus’ message and spirit for our global human predicament. Offered annually. Prerequisite: RE 103, RE 205, or RE 211. This course satisfies the 300-level Religious Studies General Education Core requirement.

RE 305 Sociology and Philosophy of Religion (3)

Religion from the perspectives of the behavioral sciences, especially sociology, and philosophy; the nature of religious experiences; higher states of consciousness (brought about by the use of drugs or other means); politics and religions; religion in the U.S. today; fundamentalism and electronic-media religions, ritual, belief and myth; faith and reason; problems of evil, death, salvation, immortality, and the existence of God. Cross-listed with PH/SO 305. Offered annually. Prerequisites: any 100-level Philosophy course and SO 200 or consent of instructor. This course may be used to satisfy the 300-level Religious Studies General Education Core requirement or the Interdisciplinary requirement.

RE 306 Early Christianity: Prophets, Martyrs, Virgins and Teachers (3)

This course will examine the central features of early Christian life: the formation of a distinct Christian identity, Christian worship and prayer, morality and ethics, theology and community organization. Of particular concern will be the thought and practice of the early Christians and how this led to the transformation of their culture in literature, spirituality, art, architecture, music and pilgrimage. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: RE 103, RE 205, or RE 211. This course satisfies the 300-level Religious Studies General Education Core requirement.

RE 307 Christianity in the Modern Age (3)

From the Reformation and Enlightenment periods to the dawn of the Third Millennium, Christianity has wrestled with modern philosophies and ideologies, the birth of the sciences and modernity’s socio-political events. Attention will be given to the spread of denominationalism and the ensuing ecumenical movement, the developing gospel of social consciousness, the complex relationship of Christian churches to secular society, the renewal efforts of Vatican II, and the ongoing work of Christian mission. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: RE 103, RE 205, or RE 211. This course satisfies the 300-level Religious Studies General Education Core requirement.

RE 308 Christian Ethics (3)

Examines the ethical implications of the Christian faith for the individual and community. Students will be engaged in a dialogue among Christian and non-Christian traditions of human dignity and social justice. Special emphasis will be placed on liberation from oppressive social structures, competing images of church and religion in society, and the assertion that humans are created in the image of God. Offered annually. Prerequisite: RE 103, RE 205, or RE 211. This course satisfies the 300-level Religious Studies General Education Core requirement.

RE 314 Hebrew Scriptures (3)

This course introduces the God of the Old Testament and details Israel’s relationship with its God over a two thousand year journey of faith. The sacred writings of the Pentateuch and both the Prophetic and Wisdom literature of Israel will be examined in detail. An understanding of Israel’s speech about the God who spoke is worthy study in itself, and an essential theological pre-history for understanding Jesus and Christianity. The significance of these texts for both contemporary Judaism and Christianity will be explored. Offered annually. Prerequisite: RE 103, RE 205, or RE 211. This course satisfies the 300-level Religious Studies General Education Core requirement.

RE 315 Christian Scriptures (3)

This course presents the New Testament times and literature as a rich mosaic of Christianity’s primal era. Examined in detail, the Pauline letters and the Gospels will serve as a window into the early Christian movement, its beliefs and practices, its diversity and unity. The major theological themes of these sacred texts will be studied, with special attention given to their application within the Christian tradition and their enduring value for the universal Christian community. Offered annually. Prerequisite: RE 103, RE 205, or RE 211. This course satisfies the 300-level Religious Studies General Education Core requirement.

RE 322 Medieval Life and Thought (3)

This course integrates the perspectives of history and religion into the study of medieval Europe (ca. 500-1500 A.D.). Students will undertake a historical overview of medieval times with a dual focus on both Church and State and their mutual influences. Consideration will be given to significant events, ideas, conditions and personalities that constitute the genesis of Europe and Christendom. Cross-listed with HI 322. Offered alternate years. Prerequisites: Any 100 or 200-level history course and any 100 or 200-level religion course. This course satisfies the 300-level Religious Studies General Education Core requirement or the Interdisciplinary requirement.

RE 324 Sexuality in Christian Life (3)

Students will explore the Christian views of marriage and the single life as a means to making their own informed choices regarding sexuality, with its moral and social responsibilities. Students will examine the paradigm of Jesus as Sacrament and the human response to that image as an adult. They will evaluate differing views regarding human behavior and lifestyles as consistent with or in opposition to a sacramental understanding of human life. Offered annually. Prerequisite: RE 103, RE 205, or RE 211. This course satisfies the 300-level Religious Studies General Education Core requirement.

RE 326 Christian Prayer (3)

Christian prayer emerges from the human response to the Trinitarian understanding of God that develops out of the experiences of early and continuing followers of Jesus Christ. Students will study both its communal and individual aspects recognizing the correlation between them in terms of life in the Christian community and the world. Students will engage in the study of several aspects of prayer, its foundation in Jesus’ life and ministry, its development as communal celebration and its continuing source for personal relationship with God. Students will be encouraged to develop their personal prayer life through participation in prayer activities throughout the term. Offered annually. Prerequisite: RE 103, RE 205, or RE 211. This course satisfies the 300-level Religious Studies General Education Core requirement.

RE 336 Ethics of Leadership (3)

Students explore the relationship between ethics and leadership in a variety of settings, within the context of an ecumenical and inter-religious dialogue. Special attention will be given to moral development theories, value conflicts and diversity, and servant leadership as a model for contemporary leadership. The goals include assisting students in their study and understanding of the personal and social dimensions of ethical perspectives and learning effective methods for dealing with relevant ethical issues within leadership studies. Offered annually. Prerequisite: RE 103, RE 205, or RE 211. This course satisfies the 300-level Religious Studies General Education Core requirement.

RE 338 Religion, Philosophy and Social Ethics (3)

Designed to give students an interdisciplinary experience in the study of social ethics from the perspectives of theology, religion and philosophy. Students will explore the theory and practice of social ethics and develop the knowledge and skills for philosophical and theological critique of ethical systems and social policy. Cross-listed with PH 338 and SO 338. Offered annually. Prerequisites: Any 100 or 200-level Religion course or any 100-level Philosophy course or consent of instructor. This course may be used to satisfy the 300-level Religious Studies General Education Core requirement or the Interdisciplinary requirement.

RE 346 Influential Women in Christianity (3)

This course surveys the life and work of especially significant women in Christianity with an emphasis on the Catholic Church. Analytical discussion employing socio-cultural, philosophical, theological, and feminist approaches will help students to understand how women have been perceived in Christian history and literature. The struggles and successes of these women will exemplify how strong faith can overcome obstacles based on stereotypes and other images. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: RE 103, RE 205, or RE 211. This course satisfies the 300-level Religious Studies General Education Core requirement.

RE 347 Justice, Development and Human Rights (3)

This course examines the inter-relationships between justice, development and human rights norms and institutions at the global level. Students will explore the historical development of these concepts and their application and evolution from the 19th century to the present. Particular emphasis will be placed on the cotemporary dialogue between Catholic Social Thought and secular international institutions that sets global norms for justice, human development and the international human rights regime. Cross-listed with POL 347. Offered annually. Prerequisites: RE 103, RE 205, or RE 211. This course satisfies the 300-level Religious Studies General Education Core requirement.

RE 357 Christians and Buddhists in Dialogue (3)

This course surveys both Christianity and Buddhism, their individual responses to questions of ultimate meaning, and their shared dialogues toward mutual understanding and challenges. Offered annually. Prerequisite: RE 103, RE 205, or RE 211. This course satisfies the 300-level Religious Studies General Education Core requirement or the Global Awareness requirement.

RE 359 India: Crossroads of Religions (3)

Throughout its history, India has been the site for the beginnings of major religious traditions and the home for imported ones as well. In the context of world religions, India serves as the fruitful ground for inter-religious dialogue as encouraged by the document Nostra Aetate from the Second Vatican Council. This course will explore the meaning of inter-religious dialogue in India, and how the society and history of India has shaped and been shaped by the many religious traditions within its borders. Offered annually. Prerequisite: RE 103, RE 205, or RE 211. This course satisfies the 300-level Religious Studies General Education Core requirement or the Global Awareness requirement.

RE 365 Introduction to Chinese Thought (3)

Students will explore Chinese thought, political structures, and patterns of harmony that have contributed to the development of Chinese culture and life. The specific emphases will include shamanism, Chinese folk religion, and the traditions of Confucianism, Taoism, Chinese Buddhism, and Neo-Confucianism. Contemporary Chinese literature will be used to explore Chinese life and religion today, as well as provide a critical frame for the analysis of western notions of philosophy and religion relative to the Chinese perspective. Offered annually. Prerequisite: RE 103, RE 205, or RE 211. This course satisfies the 300-level Religious Studies General Education Core requirement or the Global Awareness requirement. If used as an elective within the major, it cannot be used for General Education requirements.

RE 371 Nursing: Ethics and Spirituality (3)

This nursing and religious studies course explores the foundations of nursing practice from the perspectives of ethics and spirituality. The goal is to prepare nursing students to confront, understand, and communicate contemporary ethical issues, integrating a personal and social spirituality that will ground their service in the nursing profession. They will explore the Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Care Services by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops as an example of the integration of ethics and spirituality in health care. Prerequisite: RE 103, RE 205, or RE 211. This course may be used to satisfy the 300-level Religious Studies General Education Core requirement or the Interdisciplinary requirement.

RE 380/480 Special Topics (3)

Selected topics in religious studies to be announced. Past offerings include Catholic Intellectual Tradition, Judaism, Religious Education, Theology and Politics, Liturgy and Christian Worship, Spirituality of Thomas Merton, Jewish Prophets, and Taoism. May be repeated. Prerequisites vary according to topic. RE 380 Special Topics may be used to satisfy the 300-level Religious Studies General Education Core requirement.

RE 390 Transformational Leadership (3)

Transformational leadership begins with recognizing and understanding one’s own giftedness in the image of Christ to authentically respond to opportunities to serve and lead for the greatest good of the world. Building upon the servant leadership examples of biblical leaders, Chaminade’s Marianist founders and other contemporary Christian models, this course is designed to equip students with the purpose-centered skills, principles, attitudes and practiced experience needed to become transformational leaders of tomorrow whether it be among their peers, in their families, church communities, workplace, graduate school, or in public service. Offered annually. Prerequisite: RE 103, RE 205, or RE 211. This course satisfies the 300-level Religious Studies General Education Core requirement. For Religious Studies majors, this course will fulfill the Capstone requirement if additional requisites are met.

RE 425 Religion, Science and the Modern Prospect (3)

Can a person meaningfully believe in God in a world of quantum indeterminacy? Can the many discourses of the world’s religions help us to find hope in a world that the sciences tell us started with a big bang and is evolving towards a heated death? This course brings the method of the philosophy of science and that of the philosophy of religion to focus on what the sciences and religions actually do and what their respective perspectives tell us about our realities. It will be argued that contrary to the customary image of sciences and religions locked in conflict, these inquiries actually share a domain of mutual interest. Cross-listed with PH 425. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: Any 100 or 200-level Religion course or any 100-level Philosophy course or consent of instructor. See current syllabus for themes and focus of this interdisciplinary course. Satisfies the Interdisciplinary requirement.

RE 431 Environmental Ethics (3)

Examines religious perspectives on ethical issues within the context of an ecumenical and inter-religious dialogue in the field of environmental studies, with particular attention paid to contemporary Catholic ethicists. The goals are to assist students in their study and understanding of the personal and social dimensions of these ethical perspectives and learn effective methods for dealing with relevant ethical issues within environmental studies and sustainable practices. Fulfills interdisciplinary course requirement. Cross-listed with ENV 431. Offered alternate semesters. Prerequisites: RE 103, RE 205, or RE 211; and ENV 100 or permission of instructor. This course may not be used to satisfy the 300-level Religious Studies General Education Core requirement.

RE 433 Media Law and Ethics (3)

Examines the secular and religious perspectives of law and ethics in the media communication fields. Study includes First Amendment issues, prior restraint, defamation, privacy and copyright. Perspectives on personal and social meaning and  moral judgement within contemporary writers in philosophy and theology of communication. Fulfills interdisciplinary course requirements. Cross-listed with COM 433. Offered spring semester. Prerequisites: COM 200 and RE 103 or RE 205 or permission of instructor. This course may not be used to satisfy the 300-level Religious Studies General Education Core requirement.

RE 435 Ethics and Criminal Justice (3)

Examines Christian perspectives on ethical issues in the field of criminal justice. The goals are to assist students to develop an understanding of the personal and social dimensions of these ethical perspectives, methods for dealing with relevant ethical issues, and the historical development of the Christian community’s reflections and moral teachings relevant to criminal justice. This course provides competencies to meet the program outcome to allow students to demonstrate an understanding of practical knowledge regarding the inherent complexities and day-to-day operations of the American criminal justice system. Fulfills interdisciplinary course requirement. Cross-listed with CJ 435. Offered every semester. Prerequisites: RE 103, CJ 151 or CJ 201, or permission of instructor.

RE 450 Hawaiian Oral and Religious Traditions (3)

Religion has, first of all, explanatory functions: it answers systematically the overall “why” questions. Secondly, it has validating functions: it sanctions all basic institutions, values, goals; sets the standard of righteousness, personal conduct, social orders and continuity. Discussions of Hawaiian religious beliefs will establish a cultural foundation on which a clearer understanding of Hawaiian religious practices can be built. It will introduce the student to historical, cultural and religious experiences and development of the Hawaiian society from pre-contact Hawaii to the monarchy. Offered annually. Prerequisite: RE 103, RE 205, or RE 211. Fulfills Global Awareness course requirement. This course may not be used to satisfy the 300-level Religious Studies General Education Core requirement.

RE 460 Buddhism (3)

This course will explore the basic teaching of Buddhist religions through the historical development of early Buddhism and the major three branches of Theravada, Mahayana and Vajrayana. The major concepts of truth, happiness versus suffering, and interconnection of all beings will be critically discussed to illustrate the significant meaning of various types of relationships and the objectives of purposeful living. Buddhist and Catholic understandings of social issues like peace and justice will be compared and analyzed. Offered annually. Prerequisite: RE 103, RE 205, or RE 211. Fulfills Global Awareness course requirement. This course may not be used to satisfy the 300-level Religious Studies General Education Core requirement.

RE 461 Zen: Self, Being and Time (3)

A general survey of the historical development of Zen Buddhism in the East and the West will introduce student to this popular subject for many Westerners. Samples of meditation will illustrate the meaning and practice of Zen. Analytical discussion and comparison of concepts such as self, being, and time will provide students with the opportunity to understanding this tradition from their own faith background. Students will also practice zazen. Offered annually. Prerequisite: RE 103, RE 205, or RE 211. Fulfills Global Awareness course requirement. This course may not be used to satisfy the 300-level Religious Studies General Education Core requirement.

RE 463 The Psychology of Death and Dying (3)

The scope of this course is an exploration into the domain of death and dying. The focus of the course will be a psychological, philosophical, theological, ethical, biological, social and scientific inquiry to the nature of death. Topics to be examined include nature of death, life after death, assisted suicide, right to die, suicide, bereavement, death system, death counseling, death in society, and Eastern approaches to death. Focus on death will be guided by concepts derived from evolutionary theory, the stress response and stress management. Fulfills interdisciplinary course requirement. Cross-listed with PSY/PH 463. Offered annually. Prerequisites: PSY 101 or RE 103.

RE 471 Taoism (3)

Students will explore Taoism through its religious and philosophical thought and practices. This will entail a journey into Chinese shamanism, the Tao Te Ching, and later religious practices including magic, divination, ceremonies and rituals, and internal alchemical Taoism. Taoist meditation, yoga and OiGong will be examined, as well as the influences of Taoism on Chinese medicine, feng shui, martial arts, aesthetics, Ch’an Buddhism and neo-Confucianism. Students will practice T’ai Chi Ch’uan as part of this course. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: RE 103, RE 205, or RE 211. Fulfills Global Awareness course requirement. This course may not be used to satisfy the 300-level Religious Studies General Education Core requirement.

RE 472 Confucianism (3)

Students will explore the basic teaching of Confucianism through the works of Confucious, Mencius, Hsun Tzu, Fei Tzu, and the Neo-Confucians. Special attention is given to fundamental concepts such as Jen (human heartedness), Yi (right choice/conduct), Chih (wisdom, Hsin (sincerity), Li (propriety/ritual), Tao, Te (virtue), Li (principle), and Chi’I (energy). Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: RE 103, RE 205, or RE 211. Fulfills Global Awareness course requirement. This course may not be used to satisfy the 300-level Religious Studies General Education Core requirement.

RE 473 Holocaust (3)

Students will examine the history of anti-Semitism that led to the tragic destruction of most of European Jewry in the Holocaust. It involves a critical reflection on the relationship between Christianity and Judaism and the sources of the anti- Jewish polemic and modern anti-Semitism. From Elie Wiesel’s autobiographical accounts to numerous stories and experiences of the Holocaust, students will confront their own doubts and fears, hopes and dreams about the meaning of humanity after the Holocaust. Cross-listed with PH 473. Offered annually. Fulfills the interdisciplinary course requirement. Prerequisite: Any lower division Religion course; any 100-level Philosophy course, or consent of instructor.

RE 475 Transpersonal Psychology (3)

A phenomenological exploration of spiritual experience and self-transformation; focus on eastern and western traditions such as Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, mystic Judaism, Christian mysticism, and Sufism. The approach is interdisciplinary, integrating Psychology, philosophy and religion. Meditation exercises will be taught as part of the class. Fulfills either interdisciplinary or global awareness general education requirement. Cross-listed with PH/PSY 475. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: PSY 101; and RE 103 or any 100-level Philosophy course or consent of instructor.

RE 476 Buddhist Psychology (3)

A phenomenological exploration of psychological concerns such as feeling, thinking, behavior and therapy from a Buddhist perspective, including classical Buddhism, Theravada Buddhism, and Mahayana Buddhism. Special emphasis will be given to Ch’an/Zen Buddhism. The focus of the course will be on the Buddhist concepts of self, existence, meditation, suffering, consciousness, and causality. Fulfills either interdisciplinary or global awareness requirement. Cross-listed with PSY 476. Offered alternate years. Prerequisites: PSY 101 or RE 103. This course may not be used to satisfy the 300-level Religious Studies General Education Core requirement.

RE 477 Daoist Psychology (3)

This course will examine the domains of consciousness, self, behavior, spirit, social interaction, and therapeutic intervention from the perspective of Daoism. The course will explore Taoist Psychology as found in the I Ching, Dao De Ching, Chuang Tzu, Leih Tzu, and later Daoists. The course will examine the relationship between the Daoist perspective and the contemporary psychological perspectives of humanistic Psychology and existential Psychology. To assist the exploration of the psychological approach to Daoism, T’ai Chi Chu’an, Ch’I King, and Daoist breathing exercises will be taught as part of the class. Fulfills either interdisciplinary or global awareness requirement. Cross-listed with PSY 477. Offered annually in the Fall semester. Prerequisites: PSY 101 or RE 103 or permission of instructor. This course may not be used to satisfy the 300-level Religious Studies General Education Core requirement. 

RE 478 The Psychology of Taijiquan (3)

This course explores the art of Taijiquan from an interdisciplinary perspective that incorporates Psychology, philosophy, science and religion. The long form of the Yang style will be taught and T’ui Shou and Ch’I Kung will be included as supplements. The course will examine the cultural influence of Shamanism, Confucianism, Taoism, Ch’an Buddhism, Neo- Confucianism, and the I Ching on the moving meditation of Taijiquan. The influence of Taijiquan on such areas as physical health, mental well-being, consciousness, spirituality, culture, and martial arts will also be explored. Cross-listed with PSY 478. Offered annually in the Spring semester. Fulfills either interdisciplinary or global awareness requirement. Prerequisites: PSY  101 or RE 103 or permission of instructor. This course may not be used to satisfy the 300-level Religious Studies General Education Core requirement.

RE 487 Community Service Internship (1 to 9)

Students will select a community service project that will involve them in volunteer work in religious or other non-profit institutions providing direct service to the community. They are required to maintain a journal of their work experience, attend scheduled reflection sessions, prepare a final paper based on the experience, readings, and their reflection sessions, and present a job evaluation from the on-site supervisor. Selection based on permission of program advisor, job supervisor, and application interview. Credits awarded according to work load. Offered every semester. Prerequisite: RE 103, RE 205, or RE 211; junior or senior standing; and consent of program advisor. This course may not be used to satisfy the 300-level Religious Studies General Education Core requirement.

RE 490 Senior Seminar (3)

This is the capstone seminar for the Religious Studies majors. Majors will select a topic from their area of study, develop a research plan, and implement that plan to produce a final work that will be presented at an open forum at the conclusion of the semester. Sessions will be held throughout the semester to cover topics of interest to the participants and the enhancement of their understanding of the field. Offered annually. Prerequisite: Senior in Religious Studies; majors must have completed at least 21 credits or consent of program advisor. This course may not be used to satisfy the 300-level Religious Studies General Education Core requirement.

RE 499 Directed Study (1 to 3)

Individualized study on a topic arranged through the program advisor. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing, and consent  of program advisor. This course may not be used to satisfy the 300-level Religious Studies General Education Core requirement.

RE 500 RESEARCH METHODS (1)

Students will be introduced to the resources and skills required for effective research and writing in graduate-level study in theology.

RE 501 FOUNDATIONS OF BIBLICAL THEOLOGY (2)

Students will be introduced to the historical, literary, and religious aspects of the Bible as scripture and a record of a people’s faith journey. Historical data for each of the books of the Bible, story narratives, source theories, interpretive styles, and critical methodologies will be covered so that students will have a foundational understanding of the way the texts have been used within the relevant communities of faith.

RE 502 FOUNDATIONS IN SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY (2)

Students will be introduced to the major topics within systematic theology and will study each of the topics with a variety of relevant methodologies. They will become acquainted with the theological discipline, its terms and central concepts, and the ways each church and denominational tradition influences the reading of theology and its meaning for the faith communities.

RE 503 FOUNDATIONS IN HISTORICAL THEOLOGY (1)

Students explore and engage the representative texts in the related fields of church history, history of Christianity, and historical theology. Through a process of reading, writing and discussion of specific texts, students will probe the historical narratives through which authors have communicated their vision of the people, events, and institutional realities that have shaped the story of Christianity.

RE 504 FOUNDATIONS IN MORAL THEOLOGY (1)

Students will explore the development of moral theology in the Christian tradition, and its relationship to moral philosophy and ethics. Emphasis will be on clarifying Catholic Moral Theology, its historical development in relation to emerging theological stances in the Christian tradition and moral discourse in the wider society.

RE 515 INTRODUCTION TO THE NEW TESTAMENT (3)

Students will explore the development of the New Testament within the context of early Christianity. The major exegetical tools will be applied to an understanding of historical-critical meaning that leads to contemporary application.

RE 602 RETREAT: SPIRTUAL JOURNEYS (1) (REPEATABLE)

Students will share an intensive 15 hour residential retreat focused on prayerful reflection of their own spiritual journey. They will explore the relationship between their personal spiritual journeys, the study of theology, and service to the Church and community. The retreat will include structured prayer and group reflections, the role of theology in Church and society, as well as experimental learning connecting theology and pastoral ministry. This is a requirement for graduation and is offered in alternative years, generally in conjunction with PL 601 Theology of Leadership. It may be repeated.

RE 600/401 PROPHETS AND WRITINGS (3)

Students will explore the Major and Minor Prophets and Writings, including Psalms, Ruth, Lamentations, and Daniel, 1 and 2 Chronicles and Wisdom Literature.

RE 606/400 PENTATEUCH AND HISTORICAL BOOKS (3)

Studies the distinct theological traditions found in the first five books of the Bible and surveys the historical books. Students will examine the four great traditions relative to their historical period, and the other traditions with which each is joined. Emphasis on exegesis of selected passages in the Pentateuch and the Historical Books.

RE 607/413 SYNOPTIC GOSPELS AND ACTS (3)

Provides general survey of Matthew, Mark and Luke/Acts. Examines the particular religious issues, cultural background and needs of the different communities from which these Gospels were written. Enables students to understand the distinct theological vision of each on the synoptic gospels and Acts.

RE 608/415 PAULINE CORPUS AND CATHOLIC EPISTLES (3)

Introduces St/ Paul, his writings, and other significant epistles in the New Testament. Students will explore what can be known about Paul’s life from his own writings and from other witnesses. Also looks at the other major epistles developing their themes in relation to the Pauline letters.

RE 609/414 JOHANNINE WRITINGS AND REVELATION (3)

Introduces the Gospel of John and the Revelation of John (Apocalypse). Explores the content and context of these New Testament scriptures and discusses their relevance for contemporary Christian worship and spirituality.

RE 616/416 HISTORY AND THEOLOGY OF VATICAN II AND THE CATHOLIC CATECHETICISM (3)

The course studies the significant ecclesial renewal confirmed by the Second Vatican Council; the People of God, the universal call to holiness, privileges, and responsibilities of the baptized community of disciplines in mission, the role of ordained and lay faithful. It presents the foundational images of the Church as described by the Second Vatican Council. It familiarizes the student with Catholic Doctrine and belief as presented in the Catechism of the Catholic Church.

RE 621/411 HISTORY OF THE EARLY CHURCH (3)

This course surveys in depth the history of the Church: from its historical, and theological beginnings through the Middle Ages, Renaissance, and Reformation. Specific consideration will be given to: apologetic and patristic literature, theological and conciliar tracts, struggles between orthodoxy and heresy, schools and monasteries, the politics and polities of the institutional church.

RE 622/422 INTERRELIGIOUS DIALOGUE/ECUMENICAL MINISTRY (3)

The student will study efforts to recover the unity of all Christians as the gift of Christ and the work of the Holy Spirit, the common spiritual values shared by all believers and non-believers, the similarities and differences among the Catholic tradition and other Christian traditions, Jewish faith and tradition and other non-Christian religious traditions and the gifts they bring to humankind.

RE 626/426 THEOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY SIN AND GRACE (3)

The student will learn basic aspects and principles of Christian anthropology: incarnation, grace, sin, redemption, resurrection, the sacredness of human life, etc. The course will also look at issues in eschatology: death, particular judgement, purgatory, hell, heaven, last judgement, and the hope of the new heaven and the new earth.

RE 628/428 NEW EVANGELIZATION SMALL CHRISTIAN COMMUNITIES (1 to 3)

The student will learn the theological and scriptural foundations of Catholic evangelization and catechesis, develop an appreciation for strategies for evangelization in the United States in Go and Make Disciples, skills in adult catechesis, the nature and purpose of Small Christian Communities in the contemporary Church.

RE 629/RE 429 CATHOLIC SOCIAL TEACHING (3)

RE 629/RE 429 is part of the Diaconate Education Program. We will explore Catholic Social Thought, community and the common good. We will discuss the impact of Catholic Social Thought on the Church and society as Christians work toward a more peaceful and just society within a pluralistic secular world. Our work will include a detailed look at discussion within the Church on the nature and meaning of Catholic Social Teaching and how this is lived by the Church in the contemporary world.

RE 637/408 CHRISTOLOGY AND TRINITY (3)

The course examines approaches taken by contemporary theologians in discussing Jesus the Christ and his significance for the Christian faith. It looks at God as unity and trinity, God’s self-revelation in the person of Jesus, traditional, and contemporary Christological issues relating to Jesus life, death, and resurrection. Prerequisites for RE 637; either RE 607, 608 or 609: Prerequisite for RE 408 in the diaconate program is RE 501 or permission of the instructor.

RE 642 /405 ECCLESIOLOGY- THE NATURE AND MISSION OF CHRUCH (3)

Vatican II invited the Roman Catholic community to renew its understanding of the nature and mission of the Church in the world today. In this course, students will examine how the Church today is invited to understand itself in light of its ongoing journey, its assumption of a sacramental perspective and worldview, and its relationship with other Christian communities and global faiths.

RE 643/407 SACREMENTAL THEOLOGY AND PRACTICE (3)

Detailed study of the principle of sacramentality and of the individual sacrament, stressing the historical development of each and its contemporary renewal. RE 661 APPROACHES TO MORALITY (3) The student will explore and discuss the foundations of Christian morality, consisting of a historical survey of approaches and developments from the New Testament period to the present.

RE 662 CONTEMPORARY MORAL PROBLEMS (3)

An open approach to contemporary moral issues within theological perspectives.

RE 664/410 MORAL THEOLOGY: FUNDAMENTAL AND APPLIED (3)

Within an ecumenical and inter-religious discourse, the student will apply contemporary moral and ethical reasoning to the various personal and social issues encountered in contemporary society.

RE 680 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY (1 to 3)

Special Topics are theme courses that are offered on an irregular basis. They include modern theological movements, God and human existence, ecumenical theology and dialogue, theology of ministry, politics of the sacred, religion and science, religion and art, theology and film. This course is repeatable. This is a variable credit course.

RE 685/412 PASTORAL COUNSELING (3)

Study of contemporary methods of counseling in use today with specific emphasis on major concerns faced by counselors in the pastoral area.

RE 687 INTRODUCTION TO SPIRITUAL DIRECTION (2 to 3)

This introductory course will enable the student to explore the process of Spiritual Direction. It will involve one, in the skills needed to help others with their religious experience, including prayer. Basic listening and counseling skills will be practiced. Selected related topics including the theological contexts of spirituality, integration, ministry, and professional ethics as related to Spiritual Companioning and Spiritual Direction, the difference between Spiritual Companioning, Spiritual Direction, and Pastoral Counseling, and the complex issue of when and how to refer to counseling will be discussed.

RE 689 RETREAT SPIRITUAL-DIRECTION/COMPANIONSHIP (1)

This retreat will enable participants to strengthen their understanding of Spiritual Accompaniment/Companionship. They will practice the skills of listening and accompanying/companioning another within the context of prayer, explore the importance of the “contemplative posture”, practice helping the other to “notice” God’s presence, inviting God into one’s experience, and sharing that experience with a Spiritual Companion/Director. Finally, participants will discuss the importance of professional boundaries and the delicate question of when and how to refer to counseling or Spiritual Direction. May be repeated for credit.

RE 730/404 HOMILETICS (3)

Students will learn the form and structure of homily, techniques for research and presentation, and its context within the Eucharistic celebration. Emphasis on application of techniques of presentation during shared class time.

RE 731/406 CODE OF CANON LAW (3)

Students will explore the role and meaning of Canon Law in the Church. General principles of interpretation, history and its relationship to theology and pastoral praxis will be discussed. The class will focus on selected topics relevant to those in ministry.

RE 740/418 MARY IN THE CHRISTIAN TRADITION (1 to 3)

Our subject is the person and role of the mother of Jesus in religion and culture. We will examine the Scriptural teaching on Mary and continue with the historical developments in the patristic medieval, reformation and modern periods. Our course continues with anthropological considerations of Marian legends, devotions, and apparitions through depth psychology and art. This is a variable credit course.

RE 790 PASTORAL THEOLOGY SEMINAR (1)

Designed as the closure experience for practitioners, students will participate in a Capstone Seminar devoted to integration of their program studies and the outcomes of the program. Prerequisite: admission to candidacy, completion of at least one summer retreat.

PL 670/PSY 521 PERSONALITY (3)

This course provides the study of personality and its theoretical development, including assessment, major theories, history, and continuity and change. The focus is on understanding personality and its relationship to counseling theory and techniques.

PL 671/PSY 601 ETHICAL AND PROFESSIONAL ISSUES IN COUNSELING (3)

This course examines ethical, legal, and professional issues central to the practice of community counseling, school counseling, marriage and family therapy, and group work. Development of professional identity, ethical responsibilities and legal responsibilities, and liabilities are discussed within the context of professional ethical codes and relevant state regulations.

PL 673/PSY 603 INTRODUCTION TO COUNSELING SKILLS (3)

First Benchmark Course PSY 603 is the first benchmark class in which the MSCP faculty observes the actual interpersonal skills and competencies of the students. This course is designed to introduce students to the study of the profession of counseling and to provide systematic training in basic counseling skills. It provides an overview of the core MPCAC (Masters in Psychology and Counseling Accreditation Council) curriculum areas, with extensive emphasis on basic counseling skills development.

PL 675/PSY 611 GROUP PROCESSES (3)

Second Benchmark Course PSY 611 is the second benchmark class where the MSCP faculty continues to observe the actual interpersonal skills and competencies of the students. This course explores the theoretical nature of groups and the application of group theory to the group counseling process. In examining and applying theories of group counseling, the student counselor gains selfunderstanding of peer behavior, group dynamics, and the group building process as a function of participation in the group process. Prerequisite PSY 603.

PL 772/PSY 736 CROSS-CULTURAL COUNSELING (3)

This course will be an examination of the theory and processes of counseling persons in mental health, school, and marriage and family contexts from the perspectives of clients from diverse cultural backgrounds by counselors of equally diverse cultural backgrounds. The focus of the course will be on the impact of the counselor’s prejudices, biases, values, ethics, and social/cultural expectations on the counselor from a culturally diverse background. The client must be seen as part of an integrated system of mutually reciprocal components (family, environment, school, social structure, friends, culture, etc.). The counseling context will be viewed from a holistic, integrative perspective rather than an individual perspective.

PL 775/PSY 773 SPIRITUAL DIMENSIONS OF COUNSELING (3)

For some people, spirituality has been called the fifth force in counseling and psychology. This course will explore the nature, meaning, and significance of human spirituality and religion, especially as they relate to the counseling experience. To facilitate discovery, the course will employ self-examination, sharing of experiences, reading, lecture, various exercises, projects, research, and guest speakers.