Course Descriptions

PSYCHOLOGY (PSY) (PP) (SP)

PSY 101 General Psychology (3)

Survey the major theories and concepts in the study of behavior. Introduction to the psychological aspects of sensory processes, normal and abnormal development, learning, drives, emotions and social behavior. Offered every semester.

PSY 200 Life Span Development (3)

This course is a beginning developmental Psychology course to introduce students to biosocial, cognitive, and psychosocial issues of the life span. The course focuses on growth and development beginning with conception and following the unfolding life through death/dying at the end of the life cycle. Offered annually in the Spring semester. Prerequisite: PSY 101.

PSY 202 Child Development (3)

Psychological implications of human growth and behavior from infancy to adolescence, stressing affective and cognitive development. Prerequisite: PSY 101. This course is required for Early Childhood and Elementary Education majors.

English 102 and Communication 101 are prerequisites for all upper division courses.

PSY 304 The Psychology of Adolescence (3)

Psychology investigation of developmental factors in the crucial period of adolescence and analysis of youth problems in contemporary society. Prerequisite: PSY 101.

PSY 315 Behavioral Sciences Statistics (3)

Introduction to the methods and rules for organizing and interpreting observations; descriptive and inferential statistics, including frequency distributions, hypothesis testing, simple analysis of variance, estimation, and Chi-Square. Prerequisite: PSY 101. Cross-listed with CJ 315. Offered annually in the Fall semester.

PSY 316 Research Methods in Psychology (3)

Introduction to quantitative and qualitative research methodology and design; the research process; measurement;  sampling; ethics in social research (to include consideration of culture and ethnicity); survey, experimental and field research. As one of the requirements for this course, students will complete a research study and paper. Prerequisite: PSY 101.

PSY 321 Psychology of Personality (3)

This course reviews multiple perspectives of personality, including psychodynamics, trait behavior, cognitive, and phenomenological approaches. Offered annually in the Fall semester. Prerequisite: PSY 101.

PSY 322 Social Psychology (3)

This course examines the impact of social interaction on how we think, feel, and behave. The course explores interpersonal relations, social attitudes, group dynamics, inter-group relations, class and cultural influences. Offered annually in the Spring semester. Prerequisites: PSY 101.

PSY 327 Career Development in the Behavioral Sciences (3)

This course examines vocational values, interests, and aptitudes in the identification and development of a career in the Behavioral Sciences, specifically Behavioral Sciences programs, Criminal Justice, Anthropology, and Psychology. The vital role of a student’s academic background is explored relative to creating a goodness-of-fit between the student and the world of work. Students will be introduced to career guidance programs, develop a career personality profile, generate a career road map, and investigate/utilize career development tools and techniques. A broad spectrum of resources will be explored against the backdrop of local, national, and international job market trends, and the goals, interests and abilities of the job seeker. Behavioral Science Division requirement. Offered each semester. Division majors will have priority enrollment; non- majors will be enrolled based on space availability. Cross-listed with AN 327, CJ 327, and SO 327. Prerequisite: AN 200, PSY 101, or SO 200 respectively.

PSY 340 Psychology of Sexual Expression (3)

Role of Psychology in human experience as it relates to sexuality; development of individual self-concepts regarding sexuality as they relate to socially accepted behavior. Offered annually in the Fall semester. Prerequisite: PSY 101. PSY 362 Biopsychology (3) This course will review the field of biological Psychology encompassing neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, sensory,  perceptual, and motor functions, psychopharmacology, including substance use/abuse, and clinical syndromes. Topics relate to the clinical practice of Psychology (i.e., roles of neuropsychologist, rehabilitation psychologist, health psychologist), such as the assessment and treatment of brain injury/cognitive deficits, neurological syndromes, psychiatric disorders, substance abuse/dependency, learning problems and sleep disorders. Prerequisite: PSY 101.

PSY 406 Counseling Psychology (3)

Counseling approaches and techniques used in helping relationships. The course combines experiential and didactic instruction, giving the student an opportunity to explore helping strategies and develop a philosophy of counseling. Offered annually in the Spring semester. Prerequisites: PSY 101 and PSY 321.

PSY 411 The Psychology of Small Groups (3)

Behavior as a function of factors operating in groups, especially in face-to-face contact. Assessment of principles of group dynamics, alternative techniques for leadership, organization, and control. Prerequisite: PSY 101.

PSY 424 Abnormal Psychology (3)

Study of the development, treatment, and prevention of psychological disorders. Presentation of the dynamics of abnormal behavior from a biological, psychological, and socio-cultural context. Current research and assessment tools will also be covered. Offered each semester. Prerequisite: PSY 101.

PSY 434 Organizational Psychology (3)

The subfield of Psychology that deals with work in commercial and industrial settings. Areas covered include job morale, satisfaction, organizational effectiveness, growth, and change. The field covers the individual worker plus the worker in a group setting. Offered annually in the Spring. Prerequisite: PSY 101.

PSY 436 Cross-Cultural Psychology (3)

This course will provide an overview of the field of cross-cultural Psychology and examine theories of Psychology, which claim to be universal in scope. The student will learn how psychological problems and conditions vary across cultures and that the Western view of Psychology should not necessarily be taken as the norm. Prerequisite: PSY 101.

PSY 441 Community Psychology (3)

This course introduces students to the science and practice of community Psychology. It provides an overview of theory, research and action in community Psychology, which is the study and application of psychological solutions to community- based problems. It explores the relationship between stressful environments, supportive social systems and individual and family wellbeing to the development of mental illness. Prerequisites: PSY 101.

PSY 450 The Psychology of Serial Killers (3)

This course explores the minds of serial killers and mass murderers with a focus on the factors that psychologists have identified which can lead to the creation of such killers. Additionally, the course will explore many of the myths surrounding their complex psychological dynamics of serial killers. A variety of serial killers, from sexual predators to psychotic killers, from murder teams to odd eccentric stalkers will be explored. Finally, the possible motives of the serial killer will be addressed including lust, control, glory, profit, thrill, delusions, rage, the desire for company, the need to please a partner, and even murder as an intellectual exercise.

PSY 451 Health and Stress Psychology (3)

This field of Psychology deals with the relationship between psychological states, social contexts, and physical reactions. The course will examine the relationship between Psychology and health exploring such topics as stress, illness, exercise, nutrition, sleep, coping skills, relaxation, social support, and life-style changes. The focus of the course will be on stress management, adaptation to change, and preventative Psychology. Offered annually in the Fall semester. Prerequisites: PSY 101.

PSY 452 Sports Psychology (3)

This course provides an overview of the growing field of sports psychology. Topics including motivation, team cohesion, and leadership will be covered as well as psychological interventions that can be utilized by coaches and players to improve performance.

PSY 454 Extreme Psychology (3)

This course will provide an overview of some of the extreme aspects of psychology. Students will explore some of the exciting and interesting extremes of psychology including thrill seekers, high endurance athletes, warriors, mixed martial arts, isolation, cults, and genius.

PSY 455 Positive Psychology (3)

This course provides an in-depth overview of the rapidly growing field of positive Psychology. Positive Psychology is a scientific approach to maximizing human potential, well-being, and happiness. The course focuses on the psychological aspects of a fulfilling and flourishing life. Human resiliency, optimism, self-esteem, empathy, friendship, love, creativity, spirituality, humor, stress management, coping, human strengths, positive outcomes, resources, wellness and positive contexts/institutions are all central to the field of positive Psychology. The domain of positive Psychology will also be examined from Daoist, Confucian, and Buddhist perspectives. Prerequisite: PSY 101.

PSY 456 The Psychology of Movies (3)

Examination of how motion pictures depict mental illness, relationships, and other psychologically relevant issues, as well as how films depict the field of psychology itself. Topics of discussion include universal themes, the psychological value of film-making and viewing, application of theories and concepts, accuracy in the depiction of psychological variables, and psychological impact. Character analyses involve examination of personality, mental illness, developmental issues, conflicts, and motivation.

PSY 458 The Psychology of Relationships (3)

This course reviews theories, models, and the research related to different relationship formations such as familial, romantic, and friendship, and includes perspectives of healthy and distressed relationships.

PSY 463 The Psychology of Death and Dying (3)

The scope of this course is an exploration into the domain of death and dying. The focus of the course will be a psychological, philosophical, theological, ethical, biological, social and scientific inquiry to the nature of death. Topics to be examined include nature of death, life after death, assisted suicide, right to die, suicide, bereavement, death system, death counseling, death in society, and Eastern approaches to death. Focus on death will be guided by concepts derived from evolutionary theory, the stress response and stress management. Cross-listed with PH/RE 463. Offered every semester. Prerequisites: PSY 101 or RE 103.

PSY 464 Evolutionary Psychology (3)

This course focuses on the application of Darwinian and cognitive Psychology principles of evolution to the domain of Psychology. It will examine how psychological processes have evolved to assist the individual to adapt to the environment. Offered annually in the Fall. Prerequisites: PH 100 or PSY 101 or RE 103.

PSY 471 Existential Psychology (3)

A philosophical and psychological inquiry into the core of human existence. This course will examine the relationship between Psychology and philosophy exploring such topics as anxiety, death, meaninglessness, freedom, isolation, free choice, and responsibility. Cross-listed with PH 471. Prerequisites: PSY 101 or any 100-level Philosophy course or consent of instructor.

PSY 475 Transpersonal Psychology (3)

A phenomenological exploration of spiritual experience of self-transformation, with a focus on eastern and western traditions such as Hinduism, Buddhism, Daoism, mystic Judaism, Christian mysticism, and Sufism. The approach is interdisciplinary, integrating Psychology, philosophy and religion. Meditation exercises will be taught as part of the class. Cross-listed with RE/PH 475. Prerequisite: PSY 101; RE 103 or any 100-level Philosophy course or consent of instructor.

PSY 476 Buddhist Psychology (3)

A phenomenological exploration of psychological concerns such as feeling, thinking, behavior and therapy from a Buddhist perspective, including classical Buddhism, Theravada Buddhism, and Mahayana Buddhism. Special emphasis will be given to Chan/Zen Buddhism. The focus will be on the Buddhist concepts of self, existence, meditation, suffering, consciousness, and causality. Gong Zi F Hu Quan (pinyin) Gung Ji Fuk Fuk Fu Keun (Cantonese) will be taught as part of the course. Cross-listed with RE 476. Prerequisites: PSY 101 or RE 103.

PSY 477 Daoist Psychology (3)

This course will examine the domains of consciousness, self, behavior, spirit, social interaction, and therapeutic intervention from the perspective of Daoism. The course will explore Daoist Psychology as found in the Yijing, Daodejing, Zhuangzi, Liezi, and later Daoists. The course will examine the relationship between the Daoist perspective and the contemporary psychological perspectives of humanistic therapy, cognitive therapy, and existential therapy. To assist the exploration of the psychological approach to Daoism, Taijiquan, Qigong, and Daoist breathing exercises will be taught s part of the class. Cross-listed with RE 477. Prerequisites: PSY 101 or RE 103 or permission of instructor.

PSY 478 The Psychology of Taijiquan (3)

This course explores the art of Taijiquan from an interdisciplinary perspective that incorporate Psychology, philosophy, science and religion. The 40 form Yang style will be taught and Tuishou and Qigong will be included as supplements. The course will examine the cultural influence of Sharmanism, Confucianism, Daoism, Chan Buddhism, Neo-Confucianism, and the Yijing on the moving meditation of Taijiquan. The influence of Taijiquan on such areas as physical health, mental well- being, consciousness, spirituality, culture, and martial arts will also be explored. Cross-listed with RE 478.Prerequisites: PSY 101 or RE 103 or permission of instructor.

PSY 479 Psychology of Zen (3)

This course is a psychological examination of Zen and its relationship to the “self”; the focus will be on how Zazen and the Koan affect consciousness. Zen will be examined from neurological, cognitive, affective, behavioral, and spiritual perspectives. Students will engage in Zazen and Koan exploration and monitor changes in their conscious awareness. The course also explores the psychological aspects of Zen aesthetics in such areas as tea ceremony, painting, poetry, calligraphy, gardens, and martial arts. Offered alternate years. Prerequisites: PH 100 or PSY 101 or RE 103.

PSY 480 Special Topics (3)

Selected topics in Psychology to be announced. Prerequisites vary according to topic.

PSY 487 Field Experience (3)

Field experience is designed to provide field work experience/research at an approved site. Students will be supervised by an on-site supervisor and course instructor. Students will have the opportunity to gain practical experience in a real-world setting. Prerequisites: PSY 101, Psychology major, and junior or senior standing.

PSY 490 Senior Seminar in Psychology (3)

This is a capstone course that collaboratively explores the relationship between the core and elective psychology courses for students majoring in psychology. This course will guide the student toward developing an understanding of the relationship and application of the course work they have taken in the field of psychology. Students will write a research paper that integrates the core and elective courses relative to psychological research. Students will also write a paper that examines the relationship between the field of Psychology and the five Marianist educational values. At the end of the course students will sit for a Psychology program Comprehensive Exam. Students will also participate in an Exit Evaluation of the Psychology program. Offered annually in the Spring semester. Prerequisites: PSY 101, 316, and senior standing.

PSY 499 Applied Research in Psychology (3)

This is a 3-credit course that provides hands-on research experience in the field of Psychology.  The topic varies by semester but will involve participation in original psychological research.  This course emphasizes field experience and a mentor-mentee relationship between student and faculty.  The student will gain experiencing in research ethics, data collection, data entry, basic statistical analysis, and writing and presenting research findings.  Students will review the role of research scholarship in preparing for graduate education in Psychology and related fields.  Production of scholarship appropriate for a conference presentation is required.  Prerequisites: PSY 101, PSY 316 or consent of instructor.

PSY 500 SCHOOL COUNSELING AND EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN (3)

The scope of this course will be an examination of learning disabilities, emotional impairment, speech language disabilities, behavioral disturbances, mental retardation, physical and health impairments, visual and hearing disorders, early childhood learning impairments, child abuse, and alcohol/substance abuse within the K-12 educational context. The specific focus will be on the role of the counselor interventions, the special educational referral and diagnostic process, and the program evaluation.

PSY 501 THE SCHOOL COUNSELOR IN AN EDUCATIONAL CONTEXT (3)

The scope of this course will be the development of skills and techniques for a counselor to assist teachers and students within a learning context, kindergarten to grade 12; assist teachers in classroom management; design, assess, implement and evaluate a school counseling and a school guidance program; create a curriculum for a school guidance program; and assess, evaluate, and interpret students’ performance on tests within a K-12 educational environment.

PSY 521 PERSONALITY (3)

This course provides the study of personality and its theoretical development, including assessment, major theories, history, and continuity and change. The focus is on understanding personality and its relationship to counseling theory and techniques.

PSY 524 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)

This course provides the study of psychological disorders with an emphasis on DSM-5 categories. Biological and environmental determinants of abnormal behavior, symptomatology, assessment, and intervention strategies are also covered in course material. The course focuses on understanding psychological disorders relative to the counseling context, with special emphasis given to the DSM-5 diagnostic process through the format of case studies.

PSY 601 ETHICAL AND PROFESSIONAL ISSUES IN COUNSELING (3)

This course examines ethical, legal, and professional issues central to the practice of community counseling, school counseling, marriage and family therapy, and group work. Development of professional identity, ethical responsibilities and legal responsibilities, and liabilities are discussed within the context of professional ethical codes and relevant state regulations. Note: It is a program requirement that all students in PSY 601 obtain membership in a professional organization to be maintained throughout their time in the program.

PSY 602 LIFE SPAN DEVELOPMENT (3)

This course is an in-depth study of the biosocial, cognitive, and psychosocial aspects of development across the span of life beginning with prenatal growth and ending with death. The life-span perspective will focus on relevant counseling issues and concerns, discussing how development and counseling interrelate.

PSY 603 INTRODUCTION TO COUNSELING SKILLS (3)

First Benchmark Course PSY 603 is the first benchmark class in which the MSCP faculty observes the actual interpersonal skills and competencies of the students. This course is designed to introduce students to the study of the profession of counseling and to provide systematic training in basic counseling skills. It provides an overview of the core MPCAC (Masters in Psychology and Counseling Accreditation Council) curriculum areas, with extensive emphasis on basic counseling skills development.

PSY 606 PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTING AND MEASUREMENTS (3)

This course analyzes various kinds and uses of tests, gives a history and background for each, discusses their strengths and weaknesses, and develops the student’s understanding of the quantitative measurement foundations of tests. Evaluation, selection, and interpretation of psychological tests for guidance and the use of psychometric data in counseling are also covered topics. As part of the course requirement, students will administer, score, and interpret tests. Lab fee applies.

PSY 611 GROUP PROCESSES (3)

Second Benchmark Course where the MSCP faculty continues to observe the actual interpersonal skills and competencies of the students. This course explores the theoretical nature of groups and the application of group theory to the group counseling process. In examining and applying theories of group counseling, the student counselor gains self-understanding of peer behavior, group dynamics, and the group building process as a function of participation in the group process. Prerequisite PSY 603.

PSY 616 STATISTICS, RESEARCH, AND EVALUATION (3)

This course covers the fundamentals of research design, statistical analysis, and evaluation of research results within the counseling context. Computer applications for statistical analysis are utilized.

PSY 627 CAREER DEVELOPMENT (3)

This course reviews theories of vocational development, types, sources, and uses of occupational and educational information in career counseling and decision making processes in the local, national, and international job market.

PSY 636 COUNSELING THEORIES (3)

An overview of the theoretical background and practical application of selected contemporary approaches to counseling, with an emphasis on demonstration and participation. Prerequisite: PSY 521, 524, 601.

PSY 646S PRACTICUM IN COUNSELING TECHNIQUES, SCHOOL COUNSELING (3)

Third Benchmark Course Supervised experience in counseling utilizing videotapes, role-playing, audiotapes, and demonstrations. Both group and individualized instruction and supervision are stressed in didactic and experiential settings. Students will spend 100 hours (50 direct service hours, 50 administrative hours) at a practicum site under the supervision of a licensed school counselor. Prerequisite: PSY 611, 636, 771.

PSY 646MH PRACTICUM IN COUNSELING TECHNIQUES MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING (3)

Third Benchmark Course Supervised experience in counseling utilizing videotapes, role-playing, audiotapes, and demonstrations. Both group and individualized instruction and supervision are stressed in didactic and experiential settings. Students will spend 100 hours (50 direct service hours, 50 administrative hours) at a practicum site under the supervision of a licensed mental health therapist. Prerequisite: PSY 611, 636, 741.

PSY 646M PRACTICUM IN COUNSELING TECHNIQUES, MARRIAGE AND FAMILY COUNSELING (3)

Third Benchmark Course Supervised experience in counseling utilizing videotapes, role-playing, audiotapes, and demonstrations. Both group and individualized instruction and supervision are stressed in didactic and experiential settings. Students will spend 100 hours (50 direct service hours, 50 administrative hours) at a practicum site under the supervision of a licensed marriage and family therapist. Prerequisite: PSY 611, 636, 756

PSY 671 INTERNSHIP A – SCHOOL COUNSELING (3)

This course offers the student an opportunity to explore the most important concepts and techniques of guidance, with emphasis on the function and responsibilities of the school counselor. Internship requires a total of 600 hours (300 direct service hours, 300 administrative hours) to be distributed between Internships A and B. Ideally, there would be an equal distribution for each term. However, given the environment and site needs, the requirement for Internship A should be a “reasonable” amount of hours to be able to meet course and program requirements to proceed to Internship B, at which time the remainder of the 600 hours will be completed. In Internship A, students will spend approximately 300 hours (150 direct service hours, 150 administrative hours) in both an elementary and a secondary school setting where they will counsel under supervision of a licensed school counselor. Prerequisite: PSY 646S, PRAXIS II Exam-Content (School Counseling and Guidance)

PSY 672 INTERNSHIP B – SCHOOL COUNSELING (3)

This course offers the student an opportunity to continue to explore the most important concepts and techniques of guidance, with emphasis on the function and responsibilities of the school counselor. Internship requires a total of 600 hours (300 direct service hours, 300 administrative hours) to be distributed between Internships A and B. Ideally, there would be an equal distribution for each term. During Internship B the remainder of the 600 hours started during Internship A will be completed in both an elementary and a secondary school setting where the student will counsel under supervision of a licensed school counselor. Prerequisite: PSY 671.

PSY 673 INTERNSHIP A – MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING (3)

This course offers the student an opportunity to practice counseling in a supervised mental health counseling setting. In Internship A, students will spend approximately 300 hours (150 direct service hours, 150 administrative hours) in a supervised mental health setting with a variety of populations including individuals, groups, children, adults, and/or families working with problems and issues such as substance abuse, domestic violence, developmental disabilities and/or problems of daily living. The total internship experience requires students to complete 600 hours (300 direct service hours, 300 administrative hours) of counseling related duties, which are distributed between Internships A and B. Ideally, there will be an equal distribution of these hours during each term. However, given the specific environment and site needs, the 300 hour requirement for Internship A is flexible but should include a “reasonable” number of hours which will enable the student to meet course and program requirements. During Internship B, the remainder of the 600 hours will be completed. Supervision will be with a licensed mental health therapist. Prerequisite: PSY 646MH.

PSY 674 INTERNSHIP B – MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING (3)

This course offers the student an opportunity to continue to practice counseling in a supervised mental health counseling setting with a variety of populations including individuals, groups, children, adults, and/or families working with problems and issues such as substance abuse, domestic violence, developmental disabilities and/or problems of daily living. The total internship experience requires students to complete 600 hours (300 direct service hours, 300 administrative hours) of counseling related duties, which are distributed between Internships A and B. Ideally, there will be an equal distribution of these hours during each term. During Internship B, the remainder of the 600 hours started during Internship A will be completed. Supervision will be with a licensed mental health therapist. Prerequisite: PSY 673.

PSY 677 INTERNSHIP A MARRIAGE AND FAMILY COUNSELING (3)

This course offers the student an opportunity to practice family systems approaches to counseling in a mental health counseling setting, under the supervision of a licensed marriage and family therapist. In Internship A, students will spend approximately 300 hours (150 direct service hours, 150 administrative hours) in a supervised mental health setting with a variety of populations including individuals, couples, groups, children, adults, and/or families working with problems and issues as substance abuse, domestic violence, developmental disabilities and/or problems of daily living. The total internship experience requires students to complete 600 hours (300 direct service hours, 300 administrative hours) of counseling related duties, which are distributed between Internships A and B. Ideally, there will be an equal distribution of these hours during each term. However, given the specific environment and site needs, the 300 hour requirement for Internship A is flexible, but should include a “reasonable” number of hours which will enable the student to meet course and program requirements. During Internship B, the remainder of the 600 hours will be completed. Prerequisite: PSY 646M.

PSY 678 INTERNSHIP B – MARRIAGE AND FAMILY COUNSELING (3)

This course offers the student an opportunity to continue to practice family systems approaches to counseling in a supervised mental health setting with a variety of populations including individuals, couples, groups, children, adults, and/or families working with problems and issues such as substance abuse, domestic violence, developmental disabilities and/or problems of daily living, under the repression of a licensed marriage and family therapist. Internship requires a total of 600 hours (300 direct service hours, 300 administrative hours) to be distributed between A and B. Ideally, there would be an equal distribution for each term. During Internship B, the remainder of the 600 hours started during Internship A. will be completed. Prerequisite: PSY 677

PSY 705 FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY (3)

The study of criminal behavior from a psychological perspective, which looks at the criminal offender as embedded in and influenced by multiple systems within the psychosocial environment. The course will review contemporary research, theory, and practice concerning the psychology of crime and psychopathy. It reviews current research that focuses on the cognitive aspects of criminal offenders, delving into their perceptions, reasoning, beliefs, decision making, and attitudes. Aspects of prevention, intervention and treatment will be discussed along with important topics as profiling, terrorism, criminology, and forensics. This course is cross-listed as CJA 705.

PSY 710 DRUG ABUSE COUNSELING (3)

This course is designed to increase the student’s understanding of drug abuse assessment and counseling. The course emphasizes the goals, strategies, and skills needed to be effective.

PSY 712 ALCOHOL ABUSE COUNSELING (3)

This course is designed to give the student an in-depth examination of one of the most pressing social problems of our times. The course will examine the drug itself, the environment in which it is taken, influencing factors in its abuse, the effects of abuse and addiction, the disease that it becomes, and how to treat it.

PSY 720 PSYCHOLOGICAL AND EDUCATIONAL TESTING (3)

This course is designed for persons working in a school or clinic who have the responsibility for selecting, administering, and interpreting tests. This course includes review of (1) the principles of test reliability and validity; (2) survey of ability, achievement, and personality tests; and (3) practice in administering, scoring, and interpreting educational and psychological tests. The primary focus of this course is the administration, scoring, interpretation, and application of individual IQ, achievement, personality tests within a school counseling context. This is a required course for the School Counseling emphasis. Prerequisite: PSY 500, 501, 606. Lab fee applies.

PSY 736 CROSS-CULTURAL COUNSELING (3)

This course will be an examination of the theory and processes of counseling persons in mental health, school, and marriage and family contexts from the perspectives of clients from diverse cultural backgrounds by counselors of equally diverse cultural backgrounds. The focus of the course will be on the impact of the counselor’s prejudices, biases, values, ethics, and social/cultural expectations on the counselor from a culturally diverse background. The client must be seen as part of an integrated system of mutually reciprocal components (family, environment, school, social structure, friends, culture, etc.). The counseling context will be viewed from a holistic, integrative perspective rather than an individual perspective.

PSY 740 ADVANCED PSYCHOPATHOLOGY (3)

Familiarizes the student with concepts and philosophies related to psychopathology. Covers the DSM-5 classification and the different formulations which determine the development of psychopathology. Review of current assessment skills to include psychological intake, mental status exam, and the use of psychopharmacology, diagnosis/differential diagnosis, prognosis, psychological formulation, and treatment plan. Prerequisite: PSY 521, 524, 601.

PSY 741 MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING (3)

This course will examine counseling psychology within the mental health environment. The general focus of the course will be on preventative counseling within the mental health context. Models of service delivery, the impact of the environment, cross cultural concerns, ethics, the history of mental health, research, and counselor competencies will be explored. The course will specifically examine alcohol and substance abuse, physical and sexual abuse, stress management, health psychology, managed care, the relationship between economics status and mental health, delinquency and criminality, crisis counseling gerontology, consultation, social support, mental health agencies and programs, and legal and social policies related to adult individual, children, and families.

PSY 751 HEALTH, STRESS MANAGEMENT AND COUNSELING (3)

This course is an examination of counseling an individual from a holistic perspective. The course explores the relationship between health and psychological moods in such areas as stress management, diet, exercise, sleep, mind/body relations, support groups, humor, faith, responsibility, interpersonal relationships, and choice. The emphasis will be on preventative psychology. Students will participate in Taijiquan, Qugong, relaxation exercises, meditation, and visualization as part of the course.

PSY 756 MARITAL AND FAMILY COUNSELING (3)

A basic introduction to the history, development and theories of the field of family therapy. Focus is on the major theoretical models of family therapy, their similarities and differences, and conceptual foundations. Students will develop a basic understanding of family therapy concepts as applied in clinical practice, and begin to formulate their own personal framework through integration across theoretical models. Course work will also review current issues and sample recent developments in family therapy. Prerequisite: PSY 521, 601.

PSY 757 FAMILY SYSTEMS APPROACH TO COUNSELING (3)

A study of the family as a system of interactive elements, with a focus on the therapeutic implications of treating patterns of behavior rather than personalities. Course work combines readings, simulations, and videotaped role-plays to increase understanding of the complexities and intricacies of a family system. Students will examine basic differences between individual problems and family problems, individual maladaptive behaviors compared to family maladaptive behaviors, and individual consequences versus family consequences as these impact treatment design and interventions. Prerequisite: PSY 756.

PSY 758 SOLUTION FOCUSED FAMILY COUNSELING (3)

Treatment planning and interventions for family counseling from a solution-focused perspective. As an alternative to traditional counseling approaches that focus on family problems and weaknesses, students will develop an understanding of and practice counseling approaches based on family solutions and strengths. Course work also combines readings, simulations, and videotaped role-plays to examine the role of the counselor as facilitator rather than as an “expert”. Prerequisite: PSY 756.

PP 7000 History and Systems (3)

This is a graduate survey course designed to thoroughly acquaint the student with the history and philosophical issues that combine as precursors to modern psychology. Although some consider that psychology was founded in 1879 when Wilhelm Wundt opened his laboratory, actually psychology emerged from the very origins of philosophy in ancient times, grew into the disciplines of philosophy and physiology becoming a separate and distinct discipline in the late 19th century. This course will study the myriad figures, discoveries, and ideas contributing to the rise of psychology. The course will investigate how psychological thought has paralleled the development of western thought, tradition, culture, religion, medicine, and social institutions.

PSY 759 FAMILY ABUSE: SEX AND VIOLENCE (3)

An in-depth examination of the problem of family abuse designed to facilitate an understanding of the complexities of family abuse patterns, their causes, and effects. Special attention is given to the roles sex and violence play in destructive family behavior. Course work also combines readings, simulations, and videotaped role-plays to develop student understanding of the practice with systemic interventions strategies employed in cases involving family abuse. Prerequisite: PSY 756.

PSY 760 RELATIONSHIP COUNSELING (3)

Theories and associated techniques of couples, marital or relationship counseling will be explored. Course work combines readings, simulations, and videotaped role-plays to increase understanding of the complexities and intricacies of relationship counseling. Developmental issues, societal factors and cultural diversity aspects of relationships will be explored. Prerequisite: PSY 756.

PSY 761 ADVANCED THEORIES AND MODELS IN MARRIAGE AND FAMILY THERAPY (3)

This course builds on the foundations of Family Systems theory and the classical theoretical models, and will introduce advanced and contemporary therapy models within the Marriage and Family Therapy field. Students will develop an understanding of how to conceptualize couple and family relationships using the concepts of the advanced models, how to critically assess and cohesively synthesize family models, and how to utilize current evidence-based research to formulate a personal framework to work with couples and families. Prerequisite: PSY 756.

PSY 771 SCHOOL COUNSELING (3)

Examination of the most important concepts, principles, and techniques of guidance and counseling at different educational levels. This is a required course for the School Counseling emphasis. Prerequisite: PSY 500, 501. PSY 773 SPIRITUAL DIMENSIONS OF COUNSELING (3) For some people, spirituality has been called the fifth force in counseling psychology. This course will explore the nature, meaning, and significance of human spirituality and religion, especially as they relate to the counseling experience. To facilitate discovery, the course will employ self-examination, sharing of experiences, reading, lecture, various exercises, projects, research, and guest speakers.

PSY 775 CRISIS COUNSELING: MENTAL HEALTH IN THE COMMUNITY (3)

Students will become familiar with the crisis intervention approach to the delivery of mental health services. Students will examine various types of life crises within the community and determine appropriate interventions for each. This is a required course for the Mental Health Counseling emphasis.

PSY 776 CRISIS COUNSELING SCHOOL (3)

Students will become familiar with the crisis intervention approach to the delivery of mental health services. Students will examine various types of life crises and determine appropriate interventions for each. This is a required course for the School Counseling emphasis.

PSY 777 EXISTENTIAL/PHENOMENOLOGICAL INTERVENTION (3)

This course explores the fundamental components of human existence relative to the therapeutic context. Such areas as anxiety, death, isolation, meaninglessness, freedom, responsibility, and choice are examined.

PSY 778 ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)

The focus of this course is an examination of the impact/interaction of individual processes, group processes, and organizational processes upon productivity, job satisfaction, absenteeism, and turnover. The course will focus on psychology and organizations, motivation, attitudes, social behavior in organizations, leadership, stress management, analyzing work, performance appraisal and feedback, staffing, communications, groups and teams, decision making, designing effective organizations, managing change in organizations and the organizational culture.

PSY 779 PSYCHOLOGY OF DEPRESSION (3)

Depression may be a normal human emotion, a response to loss, disappointment, or failure. Some depressions, however, are biological diseases and need treatment on a biological, cognitive, and psychosocial level. Seven out of 10 persons in America will suffer a depression (of this sort) during the course of their lives. Looking at depression, causal factors, treatments (both traditional and alternative), and outcomes is the focus of this course.

PSY 780 SPECIAL TROPICS (3)

Special topics in psychological counseling.

PSY 799 DIRECTED STUDY (3)

Individualized study in counseling or related areas are arranged through the MSCP Program Director

 PP 7010 Lifespan Development (3 )

This course focuses on normal transitional aspects of development across the lifespan, including aspects of physical, cognitive, emotional, and social development. Cross-cultural, gender, familial, and historical perspectives are emphasized. Applications to the practice of clinical psychology are considered throughout the course.

 PP 7040 Cognition and Affective Processes (3)

This course offers a review of current research and theory in cognitive science, focusing on both cognitive and affective processes. Areas such as memory, attention, perception, problem solving, language, emotion, and decision making are considered. Clinical applications are emphasized throughout the course.

 PP 7041 Quantitative Inquiry (3)

This course surveys the major methodologies for completing psychological research, with an emphasis on the design of quantitative strategies for answering clinical questions. Students develop critical thinking skills to evaluate and review published research. Diversity issues in measurement are explored.

 PP7042 Statistics Laboratory (1)

Students learn statistics necessary for describing data and evaluating research instruments and complete analyses associated with the methodologies surveyed in PP7041 - Quantitative Inquiry.

 PP 7043 Qualitative Inquiry (3)

This course explores qualitative research methodologies to answer clinical questions both in research and in practice. Students develop critical thinking skills to evaluate and review published qualitative research, and gain knowledge and skills in the design of rigorous and systematic qualitative approaches relevant to clinical work and understudied populations.

 PP 7044 Consultation and Community Mental Health (3)

This course will introduce students to the theoretical and empirical knowledge as it relates to consultation and community mental health. Students will become familiar with the multiple systemic arenas in which clinical psychologists function as consultants within diverse community settings. An overview of consultation theory (including models of consultation), research, and practice will be reviewed as well as a systemic review of community mental health. Emphasis will also include application of this knowledge through comprehension of diverse relational dynamics as a psychologist working within community mental health settings.

 PP 7045 Psychopathology (3)

The concentration of the study is on the observation, description, etiology, assessment and understanding of the moderate range of symptomatology and personality and behavioral disorders of adulthood. Developmental and dynamic elements are considered in the context of diagnostic and therapeutic concerns. A methodology for organizing clinical data is presented. Also, the assessment, etiology, description, understanding and treatment of the more severe psychological disorders are emphasized. Included in the study are schizophrenia spectrum, affective disorders, and borderline psychopathology. Emphasis is on recognition of the continuum of basic psychological processes in normal and severely disturbed experience.

 PP 7051 Biological Bases of Behavior (3)

This course introduces students to the gross anatomy and the neurophysiology of the nervous system. Students are presented with updated data and findings regarding neurological functions as the foundations of human behavior. It presents an overview of endocrinological processes, adding more breadth to the purpose of this course, introducing students to the fundamentals of physiology behavior correlates. In addition, this course introduces students to the clinical ramifications of primitive reflexes and developmental undertones.

 PP 7060 Social Psychology (3)

Concepts from research and theory in social psychology are presented for the understanding of social influence on personality, human interaction, and behavior. Applications of social psychology to clinical settings are emphasized.

 PP 7100 Professional Issues: Ethics, Conduct, and Law (3)

This course explores ethical and legal issues related to professional conduct, including such topics as ethical reasoning, APA ethical principles, state regulations with respect to licensure, and rules of conduct licensure, complaint resolution procedures, confidentiality, releases, records, and the duty to warn. The course addresses ethical issues in areas such as assessment, therapy, forensics, and consultative and supervisory relationships.

 PP 7110 Professionalization Group I (1)

These discussion groups for first-year students are led by a core faculty. Students discuss topics related to professional psychology and the development of a professional identity. The faculty leading the group helps students with academic and field training planning, general consultation on problems or difficulties in the program, and questions emerging during the student’s first-year academic experience. The professionalization group does not carry academic credit.

 PP 7111 Professionalization Group II (1)

This course is a continuation of PP7110 - Professionalization Group I.

 PP 7342 Evaluation and Treatment of Diverse and Marginalized Populations (3)

This course is designed to sensitize students to issues of inclusion, exclusion, and power in clinical work with ethnically, racially, and culturally-defined groups, women and men, gay/lesbian/bisexual/ transgendered people, people with disabilities, elders, people with HIV disease, and other groups of involuntary and voluntary affiliation. Students’ awareness of their own biases and strengths in human relations is facilitated. Theory and research relevant to the mental health needs of marginalized groups is reviewed, and students develop strategies for integrating this knowledge base into clinical practice. The focus of this course is to empower the students’ continual process of self-understanding and awareness in considering the nuances that may impact them as clinicians. In addition, this course supports students in their assessment, case conceptualization, and treatment of diverse and marginalized populations as a means of promoting clinician competency, providing ethical and professional services, and maintaining self-reflexivity.

 PP 7352 Clinical Supervision (3)

The aim of this course is to provide students with an overview of theory, research and practice models for clinical supervision. Numerous conceptual models for clinical supervision are described and discussed with an emphasis on the following approaches: developmental, person-centered, psychodynamic, cognitive behavioral, skill training, systemic, and integrated. Students use role plays to begin exploring the nature of the supervisory relationship and their own emerging approach to supervising others. They also discuss common strategies, modalities, training issues and dilemmas.

 PP 7360 Clinical Psychopharmacology (3)

This course provides an introduction to psychotropic drugs, their neurochemical basis, their mechanism of action, and their clinical application.

 PP 7365 Clinical Interviewing (3)

This course offers students the opportunity to learn basic listening and interviewing skills, as well as how to conduct a full clinical interview as part of an initial assessment. Students examine directive and nondirective approaches to interviewing, and read and discuss theoretical and empirical literature. Through demonstrations, role-playing, and structured exercises, students practice and develop these skills.

 PP7370 Cognitive Assessment (3)

This course introduces the student to the major approaches and techniques for intellectual assessment in children and adults. It covers principles of test construction and psychometrics, the history of intellectual assessment, theories of intelligence, and methods of intellectual assessment. Particular attention is given to the administration and interpretation of the Wechsler intelligence tests. Alternative methods of intellectual assessment are also considered. The class may include a laboratory in which skills in administration and interpretation can be practiced.

Prerequisite(s): (CH) an undergraduate tests and measures course; (ORA) an undergraduate tests and measures course or psychological assessment concurrent; (PHX) undergraduate tests and measures course; (TAM) undergraduate tests and measures course.

 PP7371 Objective Personality Assessment (3)

This course introduces the student to the major approaches and techniques for objective personality assessment in adults. Topics covered include general principles and issues in objective assessment, and techniques of personality assessment. The primary emphasis is on the MMPI-2, with an overview of other commonly used measures of objective personality assessment. The class includes a laboratory in which skills in administration and interpretation can be practiced.

 PP7372 Projective Personality Assessment (3)

This course covers the Exner Comprehensive System for the Rorschach as well as selected projective tests. In addition to understanding theoretical underpinnings, the student is expected to develop some competency in the administration, scoring, and interpretation of these instruments. The class includes a laboratory in which skills in administration and interpretation can be practiced.

 PP7373 Integrative Assessment (3)

The course builds skills in integration of assessment data, communication of results toward answering a specific question, and development of treatment recommendations.

 PP8010 Cognitive Behavioral Theory and Therapy (3)

Major cognitive-behavioral therapies, as well as their theoretical foundations, are reviewed in this course. There is an emphasis on developing skills in cognitive behavioral analysis and treatment, with special attention to the treatment of selected disorders and personality styles.

 PP8020 Person-Centered and Experiential Theory and Therapy (3)

This course offers an introduction to the theory, research, and practice of person-centered, experiential, and existential therapy. Through experiential exercises, students learn skills that build a therapeutic relationship (e.g., genuineness, empathic understanding, and caring) and intervention skills to help clients express and explore the meanings of their experience. This course includes exercises designed to develop competency in relationship and basic counseling skills.

 PP8030 Psychodynamic Theory and Therapy (3)

The course reviews major schools of psychodynamic theories and methodology of each approach in clinical settings. Both classic psychoanalysis and contemporary theoretical approaches are covered. Attention is given to case formulation with a psychodynamic orientation and the application of psychodynamic interventions in psychotherapy. Case material is used to help students better understand the theories and techniques.

 PP8060 Group Psychotherapy (3)

This course provides an introduction to the basic principles of group psychotherapy operations. Emphasis is on gaining both firsthand experiences and a conceptual grasp of membership issues in group therapy; therefore, this course consists of both experiential and didactic components. The course engages students in a thoughtful study of group process, and is structured to help them integrate their thoughts and feelings with their experience. Theories of group development and relevant research are also addressed.

 PP8201 Practicum I (3)

The two years (four semesters) of practicum provide supervised clinical field experience. In addition to the required hours working at the assigned training site, students enrolled in practicum meet weekly in a practicum seminar led by a core faculty member. The overall practicum experience may be structured such that either the first year of practicum experience (Practicum I and Practicum II) will focus on assessment issues and the second year on psychotherapy (Practicum III and Practicum IV), or that both assessment and intervention experience will be intermixed over the two years of practicum.

 PP 8202 Practicum II (3)

See description for Practicum I (PP8201).

 PP 8203 Practicum III (3)

See description for Practicum I (PP8201).

PP 8204 Practicum IV (3)

See description for Practicum I (PP8201).

 PP 8501 Clinical Research Project I (1)

This course provides academic credit while students are in the process of completing their Clinical Research Project (CRP). Students who have completed all degree requirements except for the CRP are required to register for CRP credit each semester until their CRP is approved by their faculty committee.

 PP 8646 Introduction to Neuropsychological Assessment (3)

This course provides an introduction to the assessment of brain-behavior relationships. A variety of neuropsychological tests will be introduced, covering the major cognitive domains in neuropsychology, with an emphasis on the process by which such tests are interpreted, in light of all of the data available, including historical, interview, observational, and test data.

 PP8900 Internship (0)

This course offers a supervised field experience in a variety of community settings.

SP 600 PROFESSIONAL SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGIST IN EDUCATIONAL CONTEXT (3)

This course deals with issues in school psychology, including the history and foundations of school psychology, ethics, emergent technologies, legal issues, professional issues and standards, alternative models for delivery of school-based psychological services, as well as the roles and responsibilities of the school psychologist.


SP 601 PSYCHOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION, DEVELOPMENT, AND LEARNING (3)

This course examines psychological theories of learning and development with a focus on their application to the classroom and school setting. Theories of human development, learning, information processing, teaching, constructivism, motivation, and cultural factors are examined. 


SP 602 CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHOPATHOLOGY (3) 

This course focuses on the exploration of the classification, causes, origins (etiology), and treatment of the major psychological disorders that occur during childhood and adolescence. 

SP 603 CONSULTATION AND COLLABORATION (3)

This course explores the role of the School Psychologist as a collaborative practitioner with teachers and other professionals in education classrooms and settings as well as with students and parents of students with special needs. Effective consultation and collaboration are key for ensuring the development of programs for children with special needs the success of all children.

SP 604 SPED ASSESSMENT, IDENTIFICATION, AND PLANNING  (3)

This course focuses on both the quantitative and qualitative assessment of students referred to or enrolled in special education programs. Major topics include exceptional children, writing IEPs, behavioral observation, psychometric properties of tests, cognitive tests of ability, perceptual-motor tests, and measures of social and emotional functioning.

SP 605 BEHAVIORAL ASSESSMENT AND INTERVENTION (3)

This course examines the major behavioral  models and strategies for addressing behavior and emotional problems in the school and classroom setting.  Principles of learning theory, behavior modification, and positive behavioral supports will be focused on throughout the course. Behavioral skills and techniques will prepare students to be able to select target behaviors, understand techniques for increasing and decreasing behaviors, and develop interventions skills in areas like contingency contracting and group management strategies. 


SP 606 COGNITIVE ASSESSMENT (3)

This course is designed to address the administration, scoring, and interpretation of individual intelligence and cognitive assessment instruments.  It includes practice in administering assessments, test interpretation, report writing, and making specific recommendations for teaching strategies and materials.


SP 607 THEORY AND ASSESSMENT O PERSONALITY (3)

This course will provide an examination of personality assessment instruments that are applicable to school settings.  Students will administrator, score, interpret, and write psychological reports for selected personality assessment instruments. 

*Praxis Exam for School Psychologist required before entering Internship A

SP 671 SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGIST INTERNSHIP A (3) (300 hours)

This course offers the student an opportunity to explore the most important concepts and techniques of school psychology, with emphasis on the specific function and responsibilities of the school psychologist. Internship requires a total of 600 hours to be distributed between Internships A and B. Internships students will be under the supervision of a qualified school psychologist. Pre-requisite: PRAXIS II Exam-Content (School Psychologist)

SP 672 SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGIST INTERNSHIP B (3) (300 hours)

This course offers the student an opportunity to continue to explore the most important concepts and techniques of school psychology, with emphasis on the function and responsibilities of the school psychologist. Internship requires a total of 600 hours under the supervision of a qualified school psychologist. Prerequisite: PSY 671.